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This post is also available in: esEspañol (Spanish)

Mexico develops closer relationships with media-tech giants, Netflix and Spotify

This post is also available in: esEspañol (Spanish)

Written by: Jacob Atkins and César Miramontes

Contxto – Netflix and Spotify may be global tech giants yet they both hold a special place in the hearts of Mexicans. This past month, the two entertainment corporations made major announcements bound to make citizens happy.

Netflix

The love affair between Netflix and Mexico is so strong that the world’s largest internet entertainment platform plans to open offices in Mexico City this year.

Ted Sarandos, Netflix content executive director, announced this on February 12 to the rejoice of the Mexican streaming community. Alongside its Brazilian headquarters, this will be the company’s second Latin American development.

According to Sarandos, there are currently 50 projects in various stages of production in Mexico, one of the world’s largest consumer markets for Netflix. Truth be told, Mexico invests the most in web-based television than anywhere else in Latin America.

Back in 2018, there were 18.2 million active subscriptions for internet entertainment in Mexico. Out of these, 63 percent belonged to Netflix. You can do the math.

More Mexican-themed series coming your way

So, you enjoyed Club de Cuervos, Ingobernable and La Casa de las Flores, right?

Even better, Netflix intends to produce more original films and series set in the world’s largest Spanish speaking country. Local office space will make this endeavor all the easier.

One of the new series will be called Los corruptores (The Corruptors) based on the novel by Jorge Zepeda Patterson. Also, younger audiences may enjoy Sofía H.

Following the success of Alfonso Cuarón’s Roma that was nominateed to several categories at the Oscars, who knows what’s in store. Whatever transpires, we’re excited to see what Mexican filmmakers produce next on Netflix.

Spotify

We often consider European countries as the world’s go-to trendsetters. In the music industry, we could not be more wrong. While the United States and European countries may be influential, Mexico City has established itself as the city with the most monthly streams in Spotify.

That’s right, Mexico City appears on the map as a point of interest for musical artists around the world. In 2006, Spotify became a platform that would give us what we never imagined – music at any time, anywhere and at the right price.

Over time, the city has evolved into one of the most sophisticated digital music markets in the last five years—and we don’t see its music magnet slowing down anytime soon.

According to Spotify’s “newsroom,” the Swedish company has more than 200 million users around the world. More so, Forbes says that Mexico City is the fifth most populated city in the world with just over 21.5 million inhabitants by mid-2018.

Coincidence? Maybe, but if that’s the case, why isn’t Tokyo leading the list of streamers on Spotify? One would think that Los Angeles, New York or Paris may be others in the vanguard.

How influential is Mexico City?

Prior to their free concert in Mexico City, classic rock group Pixies saw a 346 percent increase of music streaming one week before their concert at the Zocalo in Mexico City. Three months later, the hype is not over and Mexico City continues to increase its monthly streams.

Taking into account Mexico’s large population index, it makes sense that technology platforms like Netflix and Spotify have their eyes set on Latin America and its huge population size.

What’s next?

As Mexico’s tech culture matures, it’s probable that more global corporations will eventually look over there to expand operations, who know perhaps Facebook or Youtube may be the next ones.

Mexico just so happens to be the world’s fifth-biggest Facebook consumer with over 85 million users. Back in 2017, YouTube was also recording 16.90 million unique visitors per month from Mexico.

The moral of the story – Mexicans adore the power of the world wide web. Let’s consider Netflix and Spotify to be the precursors of more good things to come.

-CM & JA

Jacob Atkins
Jacob Atkins is a journalist specializing in Latin America. He studied journalism and international relations at American University in Washington, D.C. and has previously reported from Chile, Ecuador, Haiti and Mexico. When he isn't writing he's most likely hiking or drawing.

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